Category: enviornment


Lalbagh being in the center of the City, it is quite accessible and always crowded. Even Government is trying to increase the ticket costs and the current cost is:

1. Person Entry : 10 Rs.

2. Camera Entry: 50 Rs.

No fees, before 9 AM and after 6 PM. Camera case is quite ambiguous before 9 AM and after 6 PM.

Now, what to do in Lalbagh. First of all, its a botanical garden and if you are not interested in plants, trees, lakes, birds, flowers, its merely a place to sit and talk.

1. Enjoy Flowers. It has a rose garden and other flowers like Dahlia, Cosmos will be available in the summers.

You can enjoy some of the blogs on flowers day.

Pink Rose

Pink Rose

White Rose in Lalbagh

White Rose in Lalbagh

Red Rose in Lalbagh

Red Rose in Lalbagh

Pink Rose collection in Lalbagh

Pink Rose collection in Lalbagh

Flowers at Lalbagh

Flowers at Lalbagh

2. Enjoy Hunting – Its a very rich place with lot of fishes. So, you can often see a good killing/hunting scene around it. Snakes, Pelicans, Kites, Cormorants are often can be seen in action.

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Keelback Snake gulping a big fish at Lalbagh

Keelback Snake gulping a big fish at Lalbagh

3. Enjoy Birding:

A Spot-billed Pelican flying

A Spot-billed Pelican flying

Pond Heron with a kill

Pond Heron with a kill

4. Enjoy Nature/Photo shoot – Its a great place to witness sunrise, sunset and the transformed clouds. Provides all kind of background for good photo shoot.

Sunset in Lalbagh

Sunset in Lalbagh

A beautiful view of the lake

A beautiful view of the lake

5. Butterflies – If you are interested in shooting butterflies or gaining knowledge about it. Great place again !!

Common Yellow Grass on Dahlia

Common Yellow Grass on Dahlia

Green Tailed Jay on Dhalia  flower

Green Tailed Jay on Dahlia flower

Have Fun, Do Visit. Highest no. of people use it for running/jogging/walking and worth a place to do exercise. It provide one of the coolest stretch to do so.

Do, drop us your comments and anytime you want to join us for Lalbagh trail.

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Bangalore… a city that outshines others Indian cities

Is Bangalore just an IT city? For many of us it’s just a city with many job opportunities for everyone. I came to Bangalore with the same perception. But gradually, as time passed, I realised what this city offers to one and all. This city is a mix of cultures and traditions. Bangalore has not lost its charm even after the development of IT sector. People like us, with hectic weekdays, find peace in some of the places that are within the vicinity of Bangalore.

Bird watching and photography is our passion. Many of us are aware about the famous birding spots in Bangalore. It is difficult to find such nice birding areas in other commercial cities. Thus people staying in Bangalore are keen to spend their weekend in the lap of nature. The birding spots found here can be marshy grasslands, mountains, dense forests, lakes etc. So, most of the birds can be spotted here. I leave my home at dawn with the hope of finding birds in their natural habitat. But still it seems to be a very small list of places where I have been and there is much more to see and enjoy. One of my favourite birding area is Hoskote lake. Hoskote is near to where I stay. Hoskote has different habitats for different birds. That is why it is an amazing place for all bird fanatics.

The wet grasslands in Hoskote are suitable for a variety of birds like Munia. Many winter migrants can be seen here. A large variety of Kingfishers are near the lakeside to catch a prey.

Tricoloured Munia (also called Black Headed Munia)

Tricoloured Munia (also called Black Headed Munia)

Common Kingfisher

Common Kingfisher

Jacobin Cuckoo

Jacobin Cuckoo

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier

Indian Silverbill or White-Throated Munia

Indian Silverbill or White-Throated Munia

Siberian Stonechat (female)  It is a Winter Migrant.

Siberian Stonechat (female)
          It is a Winter Migrant.

I have given one of many reasons to love Bangalore. There are many such things that I wish to write. I am still trying to unravel the other side of Bangalore that is picturesque. My upcoming journeys would cover more of Bangalore city and places near to it. Stay tuned!

Some of the snaps from the Hessarghatta grassland. Must be worth to visit again in winter.

Shrike

Shrike

Shrike

Shrike

White eye buzzard

White eye buzzard

Ashy Crowned Sparrow Lark - Female

Ashy Crowned Sparrow Lark – Female

Singing Lark

Singing Lark

Montagu's harrier

Montagu’s harrier

Scaly breasted munia

Scaly breasted munia

Ashy Crowned SparrowLark - Male and Female

Ashy Crowned SparrowLark – Male and Female

White cheeked Barbet - Making nest

White cheeked Barbet – Making nest

Ashy Crowned Sparrow lark - Male and Female

Ashy Crowned Sparrow lark – Male and Female

White cheeked Barbet - Making nest

White cheeked Barbet – Making nest

Red Wattled Lapwing

Red Wattled Lapwing

Black Kite chase to Marsh Harrier

Black Kite chase to Marsh Harrier

Spotted Owlet

Spotted Owlet

Black kite chase to Montagu's harrier

Black kite chase to Montagu’s harrier

Plain Prinia

Plain Prinia

Crimson Rose

Crimson Rose

Blue tailed bee eater

Blue tailed bee eater

Shrike - Need to see to identify it :P.

Shrike – Need to see to identify it :P.

Pied Wagtail

Pied Wagtail

Black kite chase to Montagu's harrier

Black kite chase to Montagu’s harrier

Covering route – Hebbal Lake, Nandi Hills, Hoskote and then Valley School.IMG_3077 IMG_3093 IMG_3073 IMG_3065 IMG_3058 IMG_3050 IMG_3046 IMG_2968 IMG_2979 IMG_2983 IMG_2997 IMG_3000 IMG_3025 IMG_3032 IMG_2966 IMG_2964 IMG_2962 IMG_2947 IMG_2946 IMG_2930 IMG_2927 IMG_2893 IMG_2898 IMG_2900 IMG_2907 IMG_2908 IMG_2917 IMG_2918 IMG_2886 IMG_2882 IMG_2864 IMG_2852 IMG_2842 IMG_2840 IMG_2838 IMG_2834 IMG_2833 IMG_2832 IMG_2830 IMG_2827 IMG_2824 IMG_2820 IMG_2811 IMG_2800 IMG_2798 IMG_2797

Both the places used to be the legendary for birding but I have seen the recent coverage of human race over it. Muthanallur Lake used to have small water blocks. Now, people are taking soil from there and there is no real place for waders to seat. Building construction started in Gulakmale (near T K Falls). I got very few birds, it was 2 upset trip. Enjoy the pictures. Nothing much to add that’s why I added 2 locations together.

common sandpiper, the only sandpiper i saw in Muthanallur Lake

common sandpiper, the only sandpiper i saw in Muthanallur Lake

Black Drongo

Black Drongo

Yellow Wagtail

Yellow Wagtail

Yellow Wagtail

Yellow Wagtail

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Peacock - Male

Peacock – Male

Oriental Honey Buzzard in morning shine

Oriental Honey Buzzard in morning shine

Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine Falcon

Paddyfield Pipit

Paddyfield Pipit

 

It’s great to see that almost all the trees in Valley School are in full of fruits.  My last visit was at 1.00 PM when generally we don’t get birds but still some of the snaps :-).

Coppersmith Barbet

Coppersmith Barbet

Pale billed Flowepecker

Pale billed Flowepecker

White-rumped Munia

White-rumped Munia

Blue Faced Malkoha

Blue Faced Malkoha

Bee

Bee

Indian Little Orange-Tip

Indian Little Orange-Tip

Indian Pioneer

Indian Pioneer

Dakhan Common Gull

Dakhan Common Gull

Indian Common Sailer

Indian Common Sailer

 

Let me start with a beautiful bird…

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Field report to the bngbirds egroup:

It was almost exactly three years to the day since I had been to Makalidurga.

click here to see that visit

Since we read the egroup report about the flurry of birds at Makalidurga, we decided that we’d visit again, and in the chilly dark hours of Sunday, we dilly-dallied perhaps a bit too much,

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Dilly-dallying for MCS (Mandatory Chai Stop).

so that we finally got to Makalidurga (the Gopalaswamy temple area) only around 8.15 am after a leisurely breakfast at Dodballapur.

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Common Lime, Makalidurga.

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Common Kestrel, Makalidurga

.
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Rufous-tailed Lark, Makalidurga

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Pied Bushchat against the moon!

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Life in Makalidurga.

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Grasshopper, Makalidurga.

Though we cannot claim that bird sightings overwhelmed us, the birds that we did sight were very rewarding, and we watched several for a long while. Silverbills gathering nesting material; Rufous-tailed Larks foraging on the rocky path; Kestrels hovering; two Sirkeer Malkohas which gave me an exclusive sighting…so went the list of birds, and we were quite happy to soak in the wonderful scenery and the cool, bracing weather as well.

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Pied Bushchat female, Makalidurga

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Prashanti Express, Makalidurga.

We took a look at Gunjur Lake, as well, but it seems in a very dried-up state, and by the time we got there (nearly noon) there was no activity at all.

We decided that having come all this way, we would go to Nandi Hills as well.

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Nandi betta.

We stopped at the base for lunch.

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Lunch

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Old pavilion at Nursery area, Nandi Hills.

My advice to anyone who is thinking of visiting Nandi Hills in the evening during this holiday period is simple, and consists of three words. Do not go.

The crowds were quite impressive, and I joked that instead of “birding” or “buttering” we would have to go “peopleing”. In spite of this, the Nursery area, where we spent most of our time, and the Nehru Nilaya area, did not disappoint. Olive-backed Pipits, Blue Rock Thrushes, Verditers, one male Asian Paradise Flyacatcher which Santosh captured in the course of changing from rufous to white… we wandered around, quite content with what we saw, and had a very pleasant time.

Birders:

Chandu
Kumuda
Mani
Santosh
Swethadri
and I.

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Chandu and Mani

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Chandu always has a balanced view

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Santosh but not santosh!

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Swethadri.

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The beauty of the Nursery area.

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Verditer Flycatcher, Nursery area.

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Ashy Drongo.
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Blue Rock Thrush male.

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Lovely colours…

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Almost done!

Thanks to Santosh for putting the bird list together. The Blue-faced Malkoha was rather doubtful, so it’s been left out.

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Tickell’s Blue Flycatcher, Nandi Hills.

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Santosh clicking the Tickell’s Blue (can you see where it is?)

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The Camphor tree, Nandi Hills
Birds:

Sl no Name Where
1 Babbler, Jungle Makali
2 Barbet, White-cheeked Nandi
3 Bee-eater, Green Makali
4 Bulbul, Red-vented Makali
5 Bulbul, Red-whiskered Makali
6 Bulbul, White-browed Makali
7 Bushchat, Pied Makali
8 Crow, House Makali
9 Crow, Jungle Makali
10 Dove, Laughing Makali
11 Dove, Spotted Makali
12 Drongo, Ashy Nandi
13 Drongo, Black Makali
14 Drongo, White-bellied Nandi
15 Eagle (un-id) Makali
16 Flowerpecker, Pale-billed Makali
17 Flycatcher, Asian Brown Nandi
18 Flycatcher, Asian Paradise Nandi
19 Flycatcher, Red-throated Nandi
20 Flycatcher, Tickell’s Blue Nandi
21 Flycatcher, Verditer Nandi
22 Honey-buzzard, Oriental Nandi
23 Iora, Common Makali
24 Kestrel, Common Makali
25 Koel, Indian Makali
26 Lark, Rufous-tailed Makali
27 Malkoha, Sirkeer Makali
28 Myna, Common Makali
29 Oriole, Indian Golden Nandi
30 Parakeet, Rose-ringed Nandi
31 Prinia, Ashy Makali
32 Prinia, Plain Makali
33 Robin, Indian Makali
34 Shikra Makali
35 Shrike, Bay-backed Makali
36 Silverbill, Indian Makali
37 Spurfowl, Painted Makali
38 Sunbird, Lotens Makali
39 Sunbird, Purple Makali
40 Sunbird, Purple-rumped Makali
41 Swallow, Barn Makali
42 Swallow, Red-rumped Makali
43 Tailorbird, Common Nandi
44 Thrush, Blue Rock Makali
45 Warbler, Greenish Nandi

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The kiss, Nandi Hills

To these I have to add, Kite, Common; Kite, Brahminy, Pigeon, Blue Rock, and Warbler, Booted (yes, yes, the eyebrow was there.). There was also the lone Olive-backed Pipit foraging in the Nursery “cage”. We did not see any of the other Thrushes. Some of the birds (eg Blue Rock Thrush)were sighted at both places. The Owlets that we usually see in the trees near Nandi Multicuisine Restaurant (where the road begins, just past the T-junction) were absent. We also *think* we sighted a Black Eagle, but we are not sure.

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Red-breasted Flycatcher,Nandi, 221213

Apropos of this, we were wondering if there have been Owl/Owlet sightings from Nandi Hills, as none of us could recollect seeing any such reports…can the experts throw light on this?

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Un id Caterpillar

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Peninsular Rock Agama

Butterflies:

Blue, Various (Definitely Pea Blue and Lesser Grass Blue)
Castor, Common
Cerulean, Common
Coster, Tawny
Crow, Common
Emigrant, Mottled
Jezebel, Common
Lime, Common
Mormon, Common
Psyche
Rose, Common
Rose, Crimson
Tiger, Plain
Yellow, Three-spot Grass
Yellow, Spotless
Wanderer, Common

Various beetles, bugs, dragonflies, grasshoppers, and spiders.

I’ve put up my SMS on my FB album at

https://www.facebook.com/deemopahan/media_set?set=a.10151909137458878.1073742060.587058877&type=3

Including some of the fun items that we saw, when we were having lunch!

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Dusk, Nandi Hills

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Sunset, Nandi Hills

A pleasant and enjoyable day…thanks to my dear friends!

The Black Ibis

Here

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is the Wiki entry for the

BLACK IBIS:

“The Red-naped Ibis (Pseudibis papillosa) also known as the Indian Black Ibis or just the Black Ibis, is a species of ibis found in parts of the Indian Subcontinent. The sexes are alike. It has a curlew-like long down-curved bill, a black head with a patch of crimson, and a white patch near the shoulder. This largish black bird is found at lakes, in marshes, in riverbeds and on irrigated farmland—it is not as aquatic as many other species of ibis. It is gregarious and generally forages on margins of wetlands in small numbers. It is a common breeding resident in Haryana. It nests in trees and breeds from March to October in North India.”

I was very fortunate, indeed, to stay with a friend who as a 5-acre plot of land in Ahmedabad; part of her undeveloped property is maintained as a lawn, part of it is a wilderness, and part of it is given over to growing wheat and vegetables. I had a lovely view from my bedroom window, and was lucky enough to watch these beautiful birds….they were sitting on the neighbouring buildings:

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Grazing on the lawn:

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Resting, relaxed and unthreatened, with one leg up:

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and in particular, one mother and child, on the vegetable patch.

Here’s the Ibis chick, obviously calling, “Mama!Mama!”….

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The chick is importuning its mother:

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It is running behind the mother:

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And, finally, the mother feeds it:

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I got this video of the child running around behind the mother and harassing her for food:

Children are always demanding attention, whether
Or not, they happen to have skin…or feathers!

I was away in the foothills of the Himalaya, very far away (the journey from Bangalore to Guwahati alone was 2992 km, and passed through 8 states…Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Odisha, Bihar, Jharkhand, West Bengal and Assam!) and came back with such a variety of experiences.

Just wanted to mention, in today’s world of plastic bags and cups, the biodegradable containers that are still being used in many places, that I saw on the train.

One is what is called, in Bengali, “bhAnd” (or matkA in Hindi)…the earthen cup that can be thrown on the tracks, or out of the window, or anywhere, because the mud will disintegrate again:

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This one contained “mishti doi” (sweet yogurt), one of the specialities of Bengal.

It was covered by a bit of newspaper and a rubber band:

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This was, after ages, a typical “bhAndEr chA” (tea-in-a-mud-pot)…it has a taste all its own:

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As you can see, it goes well with the cryptic crossword (that’s from The Telegraph).

When the “JhAlmoodiwAlA” came by, I asked for some,

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I got it in this “tongA”, which is Bengali for this kind of paper container:

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It’s better than an ordinary folded paper bag, as when it opens out, it has some width, and sits well on a countertop:

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The third container I liked very much was the “dOnA” (called donnai in Tamizh, and dOnA in Kannada, too), which is made of a certain type of leaf;they are stitched together, very expertly, and shaped into bowl-shapes:

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Can you see the way the stick has been expertly used to “stitch” the leaves in place?

How I wish these traditional, “eco-friendly” (to use a hackneyed term) and full-of-character containers continue to be used, and are NOT replaced by Ghastly Plastic….

Trip ends with a beautiful sighting of Indian Jackal and Wild Boar.

Indian Jackal

Indian Jackal

Wild Boar

Wild Boar

Grizzled giant squirrel

Grizzled giant squirrel

This is my trip report of Cauvery Wildlife or Cauvery River. Before reaching to the place, we got a very happening river. All sorts of action was around the river. A pond heron with a fish bigger than his mouth, a flying Lesser whistling duck, common coot with his full family, 2 brahminy kites on attack to the cooti-kid, a rat snake also with the attacking mood.  Here I will post some of the pictures around that lake, please don’t ask me which lake, what lake, these are not existing on map. Sometimes, fortune becomes experience. I wished I would be that lady who was cleaning clothes from 1 hr on that lake.

Tawny Eagle

Tawny Eagle

European Bee-eater

European Bee-eater

Indian Roller

Indian Roller

Pond Heron with its prey

Pond Heron with its prey

Pond Heron after gulping the fish

Pond Heron after gulping the fish

Common Coot Juv

Common Coot Juv

Waited for 10 min for his hunt, finally the prey under feet

Waited for 10 min for his hunt, finally the prey under feet

The sad common coot family. Mother still feeding the child

The sad common coot family. Mother still feeding the child

Lesser Whistling Duck

Lesser Whistling Duck

Lesser Whistling Duck in flight

Lesser Whistling Duck in flight

Common Moorhen Juv

Common Moorhen Juv

Bronze winged Jacana

Bronze winged Jacana

White breasted kingfisher in flight for hunt

White breasted kingfisher in flight for hunt

Moving forward, it was an exciting view of Tawny eagle getting chased by kites. Even being a strong contender, I have always seen Eagle getting chased by kites, crows, drongos. Finally, we reached to the place which was our actual search place.  A group of more than 50-60 or may be 100 European bee-eaters enjoying the sunlight on our human-made wires. We were against the sunlight and hence, the color of the bird didn’t came out as prominent as it is. Obviously its all about watching and enjoying. photography also comes on level-2 for me.  These bee-eaters belongs to the list of strong migratory birds. And happy to see them around Bangalore. May be the observed dull color is because of long migration.

Brahminy Starling

Brahminy Starling

Common Kite chasing Tawny Eagle

Common Kite chasing Tawny Eagle

Indian grey heron

Indian grey heron

Black winged stilt

Black winged stilt

Large pied Wagtail

Large pied Wagtail

Forest Owlet

Jungle Owlet

Black hooded Oriole

Black hooded Oriole

Soon, we have seen some of our wished creatures like grizzled giant squirrel and jungle owlet. I also got a small view of Brown-fish owl. Only bird of my wish, which I was not able to see was Lesser Fish Eagle. I have still not seen this beauty in Karnataka.

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