Tag Archive: lake


Lalbagh being in the center of the City, it is quite accessible and always crowded. Even Government is trying to increase the ticket costs and the current cost is:

1. Person Entry : 10 Rs.

2. Camera Entry: 50 Rs.

No fees, before 9 AM and after 6 PM. Camera case is quite ambiguous before 9 AM and after 6 PM.

Now, what to do in Lalbagh. First of all, its a botanical garden and if you are not interested in plants, trees, lakes, birds, flowers, its merely a place to sit and talk.

1. Enjoy Flowers. It has a rose garden and other flowers like Dahlia, Cosmos will be available in the summers.

You can enjoy some of the blogs on flowers day.

Pink Rose

Pink Rose

White Rose in Lalbagh

White Rose in Lalbagh

Red Rose in Lalbagh

Red Rose in Lalbagh

Pink Rose collection in Lalbagh

Pink Rose collection in Lalbagh

Flowers at Lalbagh

Flowers at Lalbagh

2. Enjoy Hunting – Its a very rich place with lot of fishes. So, you can often see a good killing/hunting scene around it. Snakes, Pelicans, Kites, Cormorants are often can be seen in action.

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Checkered keelback water snake with a Kill at Lalbagh

Keelback Snake gulping a big fish at Lalbagh

Keelback Snake gulping a big fish at Lalbagh

3. Enjoy Birding:

A Spot-billed Pelican flying

A Spot-billed Pelican flying

Pond Heron with a kill

Pond Heron with a kill

4. Enjoy Nature/Photo shoot – Its a great place to witness sunrise, sunset and the transformed clouds. Provides all kind of background for good photo shoot.

Sunset in Lalbagh

Sunset in Lalbagh

A beautiful view of the lake

A beautiful view of the lake

5. Butterflies – If you are interested in shooting butterflies or gaining knowledge about it. Great place again !!

Common Yellow Grass on Dahlia

Common Yellow Grass on Dahlia

Green Tailed Jay on Dhalia  flower

Green Tailed Jay on Dahlia flower

Have Fun, Do Visit. Highest no. of people use it for running/jogging/walking and worth a place to do exercise. It provide one of the coolest stretch to do so.

Do, drop us your comments and anytime you want to join us for Lalbagh trail.

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Bangalore… a city that outshines others Indian cities

Is Bangalore just an IT city? For many of us it’s just a city with many job opportunities for everyone. I came to Bangalore with the same perception. But gradually, as time passed, I realised what this city offers to one and all. This city is a mix of cultures and traditions. Bangalore has not lost its charm even after the development of IT sector. People like us, with hectic weekdays, find peace in some of the places that are within the vicinity of Bangalore.

Bird watching and photography is our passion. Many of us are aware about the famous birding spots in Bangalore. It is difficult to find such nice birding areas in other commercial cities. Thus people staying in Bangalore are keen to spend their weekend in the lap of nature. The birding spots found here can be marshy grasslands, mountains, dense forests, lakes etc. So, most of the birds can be spotted here. I leave my home at dawn with the hope of finding birds in their natural habitat. But still it seems to be a very small list of places where I have been and there is much more to see and enjoy. One of my favourite birding area is Hoskote lake. Hoskote is near to where I stay. Hoskote has different habitats for different birds. That is why it is an amazing place for all bird fanatics.

The wet grasslands in Hoskote are suitable for a variety of birds like Munia. Many winter migrants can be seen here. A large variety of Kingfishers are near the lakeside to catch a prey.

Tricoloured Munia (also called Black Headed Munia)

Tricoloured Munia (also called Black Headed Munia)

Common Kingfisher

Common Kingfisher

Jacobin Cuckoo

Jacobin Cuckoo

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier

Indian Silverbill or White-Throated Munia

Indian Silverbill or White-Throated Munia

Siberian Stonechat (female)  It is a Winter Migrant.

Siberian Stonechat (female)
          It is a Winter Migrant.

I have given one of many reasons to love Bangalore. There are many such things that I wish to write. I am still trying to unravel the other side of Bangalore that is picturesque. My upcoming journeys would cover more of Bangalore city and places near to it. Stay tuned!

Birding report from Hoskote

Day: 25-Oct-2014.

Type: Cloudy/Rainy.

Birding time: 7.30 to 10 AM.

Birding pictures from Hoskote.

1. A Jacobian pied cuckoo.

2. A big flock of Grey Wagtail flying. Never seen this behavior before, for Wagtails.

3. A small clash of Siberian Stonechat with Grey Wagtail – may be because of prey.

4. 10-15 common sandpiper.

5. Around 50-60 Tricolor Munia.

Small Blue Kingfisher

Small Blue Kingfisher

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier

White throated Kingfisher

White throated Kingfisher

Black Drongo

Black Drongo

Siberian Stonechat

Siberian Stonechat

Siberian Stonechat with Grey Wagtail

Siberian Stonechat with Grey Wagtail

Grey Wagtail

Grey Wagtail

Jacobian Pied Cuckoo

Jacobian Pied Cuckoo

Common Sandpiper

Common Sandpiper

Purple Heron

Purple Heron

Black Shouldered Kite - juv

Black Shouldered Kite – juv

Black Shouldered Kite - juv in flight. I never like this shot as it gives a feeling that because of me it flew off

Black Shouldered Kite – juv in flight. I never like this shot as it gives a feeling that because of me it flew off

Jerdon's Bushlark

Jerdon’s Bushlark

White throated Munia

White throated Munia

Little Ringed Plover

Little Ringed Plover

Brown Shrike

Brown Shrike

Lalbagh at its best.

Fishing on full swing, today i saw 3 boats doing fishing ! And hardly figured out any cormorant, pelicans. Painted storks were flying high. No fish to eat, critical danger to stuck in net.

Fishing at full swing

Fishing at full swing

Condition of the lake – Plastic bottles on full swing. Outside eatables are not allowed and complete inside of lalbagh is all about eatables and plastic water bottle selling. My counting gave me a figure of 15 small-big eating place inside lalbagh, so its all about picnic ?
Plastic dumping in Lake

Plastic dumping in Lake

Entry fee is Rs. 10 and camera fee has  been introduced to Rs. 50, and that officials will check at all crosses. But they will never check the romantic couples. I personally felt that Entry fee should have been made Rs.20.

 

 

Hoskote kere, 050414

Since David Frye, of Detroit, Michigan, had contacted Chandu to go to Hoskote, Thomas, his son Aakash, and I also joined in from south Bangalore.

We crossed the K R Puram bridge as dawn was breaking:

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This palm tree was bouncing an orange ball as we reached the lake:

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The lake was a mirror:

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There were an amazing number of swallows on the “bund” or the shore of the lake.

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Here’s my short video of the surfeit of swallows:

Here are two, preening:

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They sat on the dried-up trees in the lake, too:

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David Frye and Chandu arrived as we were observing the birds:

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I was very impressed with his sketching and documentation:

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Here’s our little group against the morning sun:

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L to R: Chandu, David, Vignesh( who also arrived at the same time), Thomas, and Aakash.

On the lake bed, we found an ex-crab:

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We consulted to get id’s….

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Especially one bird that was a lifer for me, the

COMMON GREENSHANK:

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Meanwhile, Sanjeev Managoli also drove up on his way to his teaching duties, and in his car, I saw this delightful Ganesha, with a laptop and a mouse:

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We took a brefus break, and here are all of us:

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And here’s IVC (Iddli, Vada, Coffee!)

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Suvarchala, Chandu’s wife, had made these delicious gulab jamuns, so we ate them, too:

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For more bird photos,

click here

to go to my FaceBook album of photos taken with the Sony,

and

click here

to go to my FaceBook album of photos taken with the Canon 30D.

I’ll add some photos from the 30D after I upload them to Flickr!

In Sundghatta, we stopped the car to watch a few birds, and as usual, these beautiful little

PURPLE-RUMPED SUNBIRDS

caught our attention as they flitted to and fro on the Calatropis bushes.

Here’s the lady…

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and the gentleman….

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The Purple-rumped Sunbird(Leptocoma zeylonica) are endemic to the Indian Subcontinent. They usually feed on nectar from flowers, but can sometimes eat insects. Purple-rumped Sunbirds are tiny at less than 10 cm long. they have medium-length thin down-curved bills and brush-tipped tubular tongues, both adaptations to their nectar feeding.I don’t know how they can eat insects with that!When the flowers are too deep to probe, they sometimes pierce the base of the flower and rob the nectar.

Their hanging pouch nests are made up of cobwebs, lichens and plant material. Imagine, collecting cobwebs and making nests out of that!

Male sunbirds can be very aggressive towards what they perceive to be rivalry.

here

is my post (July 23, 2010) about the way a male Sunbird attacked his own reflection, at JLR Bandipur, believing it to be a rival!

Hosakote kere, Karnataka, 230213

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Kamal pinged me past 10pm yesterday…and off we went,early this morning, to Hosakote Kere, with Vasuki, and having picked up Binu on the way, too.

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At the MCS (Mandatory Chai Stop).

We stopped at the bund of Hosakote Kere, with the sun still low in the eastern horizon, silhouetting the swallows…

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A

BLACK-WINGED KITE

sub-adult seemed to have wings of black…and silver…

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There were already other photographers at the kere:

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And we joined them:

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The marshy area of the kere was aglow with green algae:

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I followed some PLAIN PRINIAS through the bushes:

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Several WOOD SANDPIPERS waded around:

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It seemed as if this GREATER CORMORANT was lifting its wings in benison:

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PHEASANT-TAILED JACANAS strutted their paisley shapes about:

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a vee-formation of Cormorants went past:

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At full zoom, my camera caught these two SILVERBILLS on a little pot!

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A GREY-BELLLIED CUCKOO delighted us very briefly:

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A GLOSSY IBIS sat in the reeds

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All of a sudden, a huge flock of ducks appeared in the sky, wheeled around, and came to settle in the waters of the kere. We watched, spellbound:

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Two SPOT-BILLED PELICANS landed, and floated lightly about:

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BLACK-WINGED STILTS were in plenty:

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It was a stunning sight when at some mysterious signal they all took off:

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There were many LITTLE GREBES:

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A great sighting today by Kamal was of the

GREAT REED WARBLER

in the reeds of the lake. Alas, he could not get a shot.

There were many fishermen on the kere, in plastic coracles (though I saw the traditional bamboo ones on the bank, too.)

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The trishool of the Gangamma temple was decorated:

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The temple is the Om of the Goddess!

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You can see Shiva sitting with Parvati, with Ganga on his head:

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Everywhere, TENT SPIDERS had spun a mist:

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We took a breakfast break, and went to Sri Krishna Upahar on the main highway:

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On the bund, a borewell was being dug, and rice and freshly-caught fish were ready for cooking:

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Birds:

Babbler, Jungle
Bee-eater, Small Green
Bulbul, Red-vented
Bushchat, Pied
Bushlark, Jerdon’s
Coot, Common
Cormorant, Great
Cormorant,Little
Coucal, Greater
Crow, House
Crow, Jungle
Cuckoo, Grey-bellied
Dove, Laughing
Dove, Spotted
Drongo, Black
Duck, Spot-billed
Egret, Cattle
Egret, Great
Egret, Intermediate
Egret, Little
Flowerpecker, Pale-billed
Francolin, Grey
Garganey
Grebe, LIttle
Harrier, Eurasian Marsh
Heron, Grey
Heron, Indian Pond
Heron, Purple
Ibis, Glossy
Jacana, Pheasant-tailed
Kite, Black
Kite, Black-winged
Kite, Bramhiny
Koel, Asian
Lapwing, Red-wattled
Lark, Ashy-crowned Sparrow
Moorhen, Common
Moorhen, Purple
Myna, Common
Myna, Jungle
Oriole, Eurasian Golden
Parakeet, Rose-ringed
Pelican, Spot-billed
Pigeon, Blue Rock
Pipit, Paddyfield
Prinia, Ashy
Prinia, Plain
Robin, Indian
Roller, Indian
Sandpiper, Green
Sandpiper, Wood
Silverbill, Indian
Sparrow, House
Starling,Rosy
Stilt, Black-winged
Sunbird, Purple
Sunbird, Purple-rumped
Swallow, Barn
Swallow, Red-rumped
Swallow, Wire-tailed
Swift, Asian Palm
Tailorbird, Common
Wagtail, White-browed
Wagtail, Yellow
Warbler, Blyth’s Reed
Warbler, Booted
Warbler, Clamorous Reed
Warbler, Great Reed

Sorry, didn’t keep track of butterfies today. Was somehow tired and a little sleepy, off my form!

Photos on my FB album,

click here

I took two short videos; one, of a shimmering black line of Swallows, and a white line of Egrets:

Another of a flight of ducks, swirling over the lake, not landing but wheeling around:

Let me close with a pic of this bAginA (offering) that someone had made. A baagina usually contains a packet of arshina (turmeric), kumkum, black bangles, black beads (used in the mangalsutra), a comb, a small mirror, baLe bicchoLe, coconut, blouse piece, dhaanya (cereal), rice, toor dal, green dal, wheat or rava and jaggery cut in a cube form. The baagina is offered in a traditional mora (winnow painted with turmeric).

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Ragihalli Lake – Waterlilies and Birds.

Ragihalli provides one of the best bird sighting always. Though it the latest days I have seen lot of constructions came in Ragihalli but still the lake and the forest road is wonderful for any new birder to experienced one.

This is some of the sighting near Ragihalli Lake. And Waterlilies are making the place lovely. Please enjoy the picture and do drop your comments. For direction and other blogs, please see our place and bird report section.

Our trip this time has been joined by Aditya and Akriti. Most of the pictures have been taken by them.

tawny eagle

tawny eagle

spotted owlets

spotted owlets

short toed snake eagle

short toed snake eagle

red rumped swallow

red rumped swallow

purple rumped sunbird

purple  sunbird

Oriental honey buzzard

Oriental honey buzzard

A close inside view.

A close inside view.

lesser whislings duck

lesser whislings duck

lotus

Waterlilies

Waterlilies

Waterlilies

A close inside view.

A close inside view.

A close inside view.

A close inside view.

lesser whisling duck

lesser whisling duck

crimson rose

crimson rose

crested serpant eagle

crested serpant eagle

Our eyes pass over cows and bulls, we are so used to them being around that we sometimes see them but don’t notice them at all!

The cattle don’t pay entry fees

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They wander in and out as they please.

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A Brahminy Bull knows life can be a rag…

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They’re internet-savvy..they also use tags.

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There’s no high point of view,no moral steeple

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But through a country’s cattle… we see its people.

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While on the birding trip, we visited the large Hennagara lake, and Prashanth, who lives in Jigani and seems very knowledgeable about the area, pointed out he nAga dEvathA temple at Hennagara Kere (lake).

Here’s the temple, on the lake-bund (raised bank):

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The rock on the right was the original object of worship and veneration:

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Prashanth told me a very interesting piece of folklore connected to this temple. In the several centuries that this lake has been in existence, he said, the lake has never overflowed in a flood situation. The people of the area venerated this rock as the “nAgA” (snake, or more specifically, cobra) that “drank up” the excess flood waters, and prevented the lake from ever overflowing its banks.

I wondered if, perhaps, there was some sort of water conduit under this rock that led away excess water to other water bodies around (such as Haragadde…Prashanth tells me many of these lakes are inter-connected)…and whether that might account for it. But since I have no way of finding out….I’ll put it down to that intangible thing that yet moves mountains: Faith.

An open-air part of the temple also has various carved figurines.

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the old rock images, and some new carved ones, facing the kere, have been covered by a cement structure quite recently.

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The image of the nAga dEvathA in the new temple faces the other direction, and there is also a shrine to Ganesha and to Parvathi.

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The trash that every temple in our country seems to generate, alas:

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The surrounding area of the temple was strewn with the ghee packets, milk packets, agarbathi packets, and old flowers from previous pujas. It seems strange to me that we venerate our gods but do not want to even keep their temples clean!

Just outside the temple are these there hOma kuNdA, where ritual offerings are made to fire (agni) to convey to the gods. They, too, seem in disuse:

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We have a million such temples, scattered around our countryside, each with its own interesting mythology and tales. One could spend a lifetime listening to these chronicles!

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